Hermeneutics

Hermeneutics is the art and science of interpretation; biblical hermeneutics is the art and science of interpreting the Bible.


D.A. Carson from "Must I Learn How To Interpret The Bible?"

We affirm that the Person and work of Jesus Christ are the central focus of the entire Bible.


We deny that any method of interpretation which rejects or obscures the Christ-centeredness of Scripture is correct.


Chicago Statement on Biblical Hermeneutics (Article III)

We ought to read the Scriptures with the express design of finding Christ in them. Whoever shall turn aside from this object, though he may weary himself throughout his whole life in learning, will never attain the knowledge of the truth; for what wisdom can we have without wisdom of God?

John Calvin Commentary on John 5:39

The history of Jesus is thus the hermeneutical key to the biblical canon as a whole. Jesus Christ is the hermeneutical key not only to the history of Israel but to the history of the world, and hence to the meaning of life, for he is the Logos through whom all things were made.

Jesus Christ is the content of the Scriptural witness, the one who interprets the Old Testament witness, and the one who commissions the New Testament witness. Accordingly, Jesus is both the material and the formal principle of the canon: its substance and its hermeneutic.

Kevin J. Vanhoozer from The Drama of Doctrine (pg. 223 and 195)

By referring to the gospel as the hermeneutical key I mean that proper interpretation of any part of the Bible requires us to relate it to the person and work of Jesus. This was recognized in Article III of the Chicago Statement on Biblical Hermeneutics, which says, "We affirm that the Person and work of Jesus Christ are the central focus of the entire Bible." We have already considered some of the ramifications of Jesus' post-resurrection claims that all the Scriptures are about him. This is another way of saying that Jesus is the sole mediator of the truth of God. This mediatorial role has great significance for how we understand the Bible. For there is one God; there is also one mediator between God and humankind, Christ Jesus, himself human who gave himself a ransom for all (1 Timothy 2:5-6). The Jesus who mediates the word of God to us is the Jesus who is defined in terms of his historic saving act. The meaning of the Bible, in that case, is tied to the saving work of Jesus

Graeme Goldsworthy from Preaching the Whole Bible as Christian Scripture (pg. 84)

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