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10 classic Christian books for your Kindle or Smart Phone that are free on Monergism

Many classics of ther Christian faith are out of the average person's price range. We have made some of them available for free. 

iPhone, iPad Users: To open ePub in iPhone open the file with Safari, NOT YOUR FACEBOOK APP. You must tap the 3 vertical dots in the bottom right, which says Open in Safari then tap the epub link and then tap Open in iBooks in the top right. Hope this helps

Android Users: Open with Google Play Books (default on your device). Even if you usually use Kindle there may be an even simpler option for downloading eBooks on Monergism to your Android: tap on the ePub file on the Monergism download page as it will automatically open in Google Play Books, an app that comes default with your Android device. Seems to have most of the features of Kindle and it opens up right in your device without the extra steps...

Kindle Users: You can always upload .mobi files to your device with a USB cord to the folder called "documents" ... but if you upload eBooks often, I would encourage you to
1) get the free app from Amazon called "send to Kindle" which will wirelessly upload the file to your Kindle device(s) in an instant. Or
2) you may also send them as an attachment to your [email protected] email address which also sends it wirelessly to your Kindle.

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1. Augustine, Confessions

2. Athanasius, On the Incarnation

3. Martin Luther, The Bondage of the Will

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 15:07 -- john_hendryx

Do you think repentance means we simply stop sinning?

Repentance does not mean you simply stop sinning. It means, rather, by the grace of God, turning to the only one who has the power to enable you to do so. Being a Christian is not a self-salvation project but an appeal to the grace of God in Jesus Christ as our only hope. Otherwise, left to ourselves, none of us could change. EVER. No amount of therapy or will power could help. Before Christ opened our heart to the gospel, we are all caught in ways of bondage that we could not change. If we could change ourselves we would not need Christ. Part of the problem is that people are still stuck on trying, at least partly, to save themselves. But what is impossible with man (faith, repentance) is possible with God. (Luke 18:27)

Jesus said to them, "It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."

Just like you don't need a doctor unless you are sick, in a similar way you don't need a Savior unless you are a sinner. Jesus came to save those who know themselves to be sinners. Man is naturally proud and does not want to admit he is a rebel sinner in need of rescue. In context to the above quote the Pharisees are questioning Jesus as to why he eats with tax collectors and sinners. Thinking themselves more righteous than the rest, these Pharisees are revealed to be people who do not admit they are sinners in need of grace, but proud and think they deserve God's favor. So the call to repentance begins with acknowledging that you are caught in sin, incapable of freeing yourself from its' captivity and an appeal to Christ alone for deliverance from sin's guilt and power.

Tue, 10/03/2017 - 07:09 -- john_hendryx

Knowing Our God

Thus says the LORD: "Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the LORD" Jeremiah 9:23-24

Introduction

Of all the possible pursuits, activities, or studies that are practically relevant and positively beneficial which we might spend our time pursuing, there is none, however profitable or necessary, that is as needful and uplifting and valuable as the subject matter of this study. As Christians, there is nothing more practical for us than to know our God. As created beings, there is nothing we need more than to understand our Creator. As desperate and wandering souls searching for significance, longing for something that is infinitely satisfying, seeking pleasure from finite things when God "œhas set eternity in [our] heart" (Ecclesiastes 3:11), there is nothing that can even begin to answer to the depths of our vast needs, desires, and longings, except for one thing. That one thing is knowing our God. And that one thing is what we are hoping by his grace to pursue in this study. I hope that all of us can resonate with the truth A. W. Pink once observed, that "œa spiritual and saving knowledge of God is the greatest need of every human creature," and furthermore, that "œthe foundation of all true knowledge of God must be a clear mental apprehension of His perfections as revealed in Holy Scripture." As we turn to the scriptures, it is with the hope and prayer that God will " shine in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ" (II Corinthians 4:6).

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 14:42 -- john_hendryx

Joseph, a Type of Christ

And God sent me before you to preserve for you a remnant on earth, and to keep alive for you many survivors. So it was not you who sent me here, but God. He has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house and ruler over all the land of Egypt. Gen. 45:7-8

For the last few days I have been reading the Genesis story of Joseph to my 6 year old son and pointed out that there were many similarities (or types) in the stories between Joseph and Jesus. On our way to the bus stop we talked about the Scripture that shows where both of them were betrayed, and my son quickly responded by declaring that God also brought about a good outcome through that same betrayal. I was delighted to see that he made this connection. In both cases God intended that the evil choices of men would be the means to bring about deliverance for His people. Joseph was a type of Christ in that he suffered unjustly by his brethren and then ended up saving many of the very people who originally intended to do him harm.

I often use passages such as Genesis 50:20 as well as Acts 2 & 4 in theological debates to show God's meticulous providence that he can even ordain evil to bring about a good purpose.

 "As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today." - Gen 50:20

this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men." - Acts 2:23

Thu, 09/28/2017 - 15:51 -- john_hendryx

Christ, Our Great Substitute

by Thaddeus Williams

“For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”
(2 Corinthians 5:21)

What is substitutionary atonement?

The cross of Jesus is where the substitutionary atonement happened. On the cross, Jesus served as our substitute and atoned for our sin (2 Corinthians 5:21).

At the cross, our sin became Christ’s sin, our blameworthiness became Christ’s blameworthiness, the wrath we deserve from an infinitely just Being became the wrath He absorbed from an infinitely just Being. It made salvation possible for spiritually dead sinners wrought with guilt. As if this weren’t good news enough, Christ’s blamelessness became our blamelessness, Christ’s reward became our reward, Christ’s perfection our perfection, and Christ’s confident standing before the holy and just Father became our confident standing before the holy and just Father.

We can no more improve on Christ’s imputed righteousness than we can count past infinity.

“This is our acquittal: the guilt that held us liable for punishment has been transferred to the head of the Son of God…We must, above all, remember this substitution, lest we tremble and remain anxious throughout life—as if God’s righteous vengeance, which the Son of God has taken upon himself, still hung over us….[To] take away all cause for enmity and to reconcile us utterly to himself, he wipes out all evil in us by the expiation set forth in the death of Christ; that we, who were previously unclean and impure, may show ourselves righteous and holy in his sight.”
(John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, vol. 2, pp. 506, 510)

Sat, 09/16/2017 - 19:09 -- john_hendryx

On God, Providence, and Natural Disasters

Guest Post by Steve Hays

1. Two recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida renewed perennial debates about the problem of natural evil. Calvinists and freewill theists give different answers. A friend asked me to comment on this old screed by Rachel Held Evans:
 
I rarely read RHE. Outrage is crack cocaine for folks like RHE. The moral satisfaction of waxing judgmental gives them a temporary high. They're addicted to indignation. They live for indignation. Because the high wears off, they are constantly on the lookout for something wax indignant about. 
 
In her post, RHE uses John Piper as a foil to attack Calvinism in general. She also uses the occasion as a pretext to launch into a gratuitous tirade against C. J. Mahaney. I say gratuitous because that has nothing to do with natural evil. 
 
In this post I'm not going to comment on the allegations against Mahaney, both because it's a red herring in relation to the primary topic of her post, and simply because I'm in no position to offer an informed opinion regarding his complicity, if any, in the scandal. 

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 15:42 -- john_hendryx

Do you believe God sent the hurricane(s)?

Yes, I believe God ordains all that comes to pass (Eph 1:11) If a calamity occurs in a city has not the LORD done it?" (Amos 3:6). After losing all ten of his children after a great wind had caused the collapse of his son's house, Job says, "The LORD gave and the LORD has taken away. Blessed be the name of the LORD" (Job 1:21). After being covered with boils he says, "Shall we indeed accept good from God and not accept adversity?" (Job 2:10). Our world has been under judgment since the Fall, so there is sickness, death and calamity.

Jesus declared that disasters are reminders that we all live in our fallen world, of life's precariousness and ought to cause us all to repent:

(Quote) "...those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them: do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others who lived in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” (Luke 13:1–5)

Does this mean we (the church) should sit on our hands? No, I am thankful that God also ordains that his church would engage in acts of mercy and pray ... and that the prayers of His saints will play a role in, and affect the outcome of events and be instrumental in the salvation of souls. God ordains both the means and the ends.

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:51 -- john_hendryx

The Double Cure

When the Holy Spirit regenerates a man and joins him to Christ, He shows him the heinousness of his sin. Seeing he cannot save himself from it, the sinner appeals to Christ to deliver him both from 1) sin's guilt and 2) from its power; from God's wrath and from sin's bondage; to not only justify him, but to sanctify him --- to apply the double cure. Christ did not die for our sin so we could have peace with sin but so that we would go to war with sin. No regenerate man says 'Lord forgive my guilt but leave me in my bondage to my sin.' No, by the grace of God, he flees from sin to Christ for salvation - salvation from God's wrath as well as deliverance from our sinful self, for the power of the Spirit to put off sin. So unlike some modern teaching, salvation does not merely consist of being delivered from God's wrath but includes much more. Many in the justification-only crowd and some liberal theologians have used this theology as an excuse to live in sin. But as J. I. Packer once said, "A half-truth masquerading as the whole truth becomes a complete untruth."

Thu, 09/07/2017 - 14:23 -- john_hendryx

Amillennialism and The “Future” Kingdom of God

A common misunderstanding about amillennialism is that “covenant theologians regard the kingdom of God as a wholly invisible and wholly present reality with no future, earthly fulfillment.” It is argued that because amillennialists have no place in their eschatological scheme for Jesus reigning upon a earthly throne in Jerusalem, they therefore by necessity have no place for an earthly, consummated kingdom. Far to the contrary, the amillennial position on the nature of God’s kingdom is that it is both a present and future reality – i.e., that it is both already-and-not-yet, inaugurated but not consummated – and that both these present and future elements of the kingdom include spiritual as well as earthly dimensions. This fulfillment, however, will not take place during a future millennial period but rather at the end of the age when Christ returns and heaven and earth are renewed. To say that because amillennialists do not affirm Christ’s earthly reign “from a throne in Jerusalem” then they cannot affirm an earthly future for God’s kingdom is to confuse a particular (premillennial) understanding of what Christ’s reign will look like with the broader category of God’s kingdom. Such an assertion would be similar to an amillennialist saying that because premillennialists do not affirm that Satan is currently bound so they cannot affirm the current, spiritual presence of God’s kingdom.

The follow excepts conclusively show that the above position is the amillennial position.

Kim Riddlebarger, A Case for Amillennialism

Tue, 09/05/2017 - 14:13 -- john_hendryx

The Nashville Statement and Acting in Love Toward our Neighbor

Just a couple of comments on one of the articles in the Nashville Statement

ARTICLE 10
WE AFFIRM that it is sinful to approve of homosexual immorality or transgenderism and that such approval constitutes an essential departure from Christian faithfulness and witness.

WE DENY that the approval of homosexual immorality or transgenderism is a matter of moral indifference about which otherwise faithful Christians should agree to disagree

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If I may add my 2 cents to Article 10:

Those within the visible church who APPROVE of homosexual immorality are not acting in love toward our neighbor but, for fear of man's opinion, are denying him or her the gospel, which is the only hope for any of us. Those churches who approve are, therefore, guilty of doing harm and/or murdering souls.

If I say to the wicked, ‘You shall surely die,’ and you give him no warning, nor speak to warn the wicked from his wicked way, in order to save his life, that wicked person shall die for his iniquity, but his blood I will require at your hand." - Ezek 3:18

Wed, 08/30/2017 - 14:18 -- john_hendryx

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